ON THIS DAY
           IN HISTORY
(or understanding of) human nature, there is
virtually universal reliance upon the notion
that the intellectual realization of human
equality naturally translates to universal
practice.
Indeed less then an hour has passed since
our nation declared liberty and justice for
all. It is April 1865 and circumstances
conspire to reward old ways of thinking.
The application of collective values seem
less and less reflective of any meaningful
outcome resembling the ideals described in
the Constitution. The 13th Amendment has
been passed into law and the Civil War is
over but, has anything really changed? Our
greatest President has jut been murdered
A strength and character tempered by a collective suffering
is manifest through activism and optimism among black
Americans. The opportunity for reconciliation and is truly
upon a very young nation.  Hope in that particular frame of
history is symbolized by an alleged encounter during a
church service attended by an unidentified black man and
the former commander of the Confederacy, General Robert
E. Lee.
ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

Fast-forward to 6:40 pm (
DY2)

The year is 1865...

Less then an hour has passed  since our nation declared liberty and justice for all. The
Emancipation Proclamation has been initiated and the Civil War is over. Imagine the feeling
of a black person at the time realizing that an equality so obviously intended by the
Creative forces of the universe was finally realized by all. Many good American citizens
(especially those to this point yet to be recognized) greet emancipation from slavery with
optimism and/or relief both as perpetrators-by-association and as victims. The promise of
a great weight being relieved is surely very welcomed by the majority
The description of the encounter holds that, during religious services in a local church a black
man arose from his seat then proceeds to the front of the church to receive communion as a
hushed congregation beholds the sight. After a few moments of uncomfortable silence, it is
General Lee who rises, then proceeds to the alter to join this man in receipt of communion.
Legend describes the man as recognized by no one and never seen again- leading many to
speculate supernatural forces held sway if only for a moment.

...and it is only a moment...this encounter will in no way represent that which is to follow.

over his adopted commitment to these ideals and, a damaged nation clings to a fragile union.
The leader of a nation accepted the burden of insisting upon "justice and liberty for all"
following a realization this obligation was his charge; he is now dead. There is now no person
with similar depth of understanding who can assume any position of similar influence.
It is April 1865- we have only the ability to speculate on what we lost. As we mourn a
senseless and tragic death we wonder if there is any person or force to fill the void.  Although
we cannot know it at this moment, our greatest hope is that future citizens will find a  way to
assure the fate of any great cause is less dependent upon a single individual.  Surely…
someday they will, but this is of no consolation at the moment.
Meanwhile, there is no
legislatively-backed mechanism to
recognize and/or include the black person
as a contributing member of society. Little
did change; in many ways, things will get
worse.  With little consideration to

600,000 lives lost to the Civil War.  All who died...died in  vain